Tag Archives: Jambinai

Jambinai and Mono: Post-Rock blasts into Platform 61

It’s dark, grungy, soaring post-rock fun! Korea’s Jambinai and Japan’s Mono will be teaming up for a big show on Jan. 21 at Platform 61, the new creative venue that recently opening in Chang-dong, Dobong-gu.

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Both groups have enjoyed very strong reviews and ratings for their most recent releases from a whole bunch of music websites, like Allmusic (Jambinai and Mono). So having these two hot groups together on one bill should be a lot of fun.

Ssako, Jambinai’s manager, wrote to the KGG to say that he was concerned the online ticketing could be tricky for non-Korean speakers hoping to check out the show, so he is suggesting an alternative.

Just email hivcore@daum.net, and leave your name and the number of tickets you want. Then on the day of the show, you can pick up your tickets at the Platform 61 box office for the same price as the advanced sales, just 66,000 won (at the door, they will be 77,000 won). You can pay by cash or credit card.

Platform 61 is located close to Changdong Station, on subway line No. 4, in northeast Seoul.

To get a sense of the noisy glory that is Mono, here is the music video for their “Requiem for Hell”:

And Jambinai’s “They Keep the Silence”:

Rocking Apgujeong

Hello, Korea Gig Guide readers. It’s been a heck of a long time since I posted here. But it is definitely good to be back. I started the KGG way back in early 2008, but after moving to Europe, I thought it did not make much sense for me to write about live music in Korea. Fortunately, Shawn was doing such a great job* here, it was the easiest thing in the world to give him the reins.

*And by “job,” I mean toiling away endlessly for free.

Anyhow, after a few years in Barcelona**, I’m back in Korea again, at least for a while, and I am getting back into the local music scene. So far, it does seem like things have been getting better since I’ve been gone. There are a lot more buskers out on the streets these days, in various parts of town (especially in Insa-dong). And there are more indie-music shows on Korean TV, which is pretty important for exposure. Plus there are so many more music festivals now, it’s kind of amazing.

**Barcelona was pretty dire for music — it has some decent bands and a surprisingly fun bluegrass scene, but there’s just very little grassroots interest in indie music there. Big festivals do great, like Primavera and Sonar, but not so much the clubs.

Last Sunday, Shawn and I traveled down to Apgujeong, of all places, to catch some shows at a relatively new venue called Keu Keu (aka Club Kklvsht, aka “Live Shit Keu Keu”). In the past, Apgujeong was better known for trendy clubs and discos than for live music, but I am happy to see live music escaping from Hongdae as often as possible. Plus, with the new subway line finally open, it is much easier to get to that part of town.

Keu Keu is one of the more interesting locations I’ve seen in Korea, with two large rooms and four smaller room, full of funky art and low, beanbag chairs. Booze was really pricy, but that’s what you get in Apgujeong, I guess.

The day had a pretty full lineup of performers, artists, and music, but we were mostly there for Modsdive, Jambinai, and Kumca. Modsdive was pretty typical postrock — pleasant enough, but a lot of the chord progressions and structures typical to the genre.

Jambinai is one of my favorite Korean groups, however, as soon as the show started, Kim Bo-mi’s haegeum broke, leaving the group rather incapacitated. They tried gamely to keep going, but the haegeum is such an integral part to their sound, they had to call it quits early.

Jambinai

Kumca gets a prize for one of the weirder names I’ve come across in Korean music. That’s short for “Kkume Kamerareul Gajyeoolgeol” (“I Should Have Brought a Camera to My Dream”). Despite having a singer, Kumca was also very postrock, but in a dreamier, more psychedelic style.

Like many of the bands on Sunday, Kumca played with a variety of videos playing in the background, adding to the eerie ambiance (although doing little to add to my lousy photography skills).

But it looks like Keu Keu is getting some pretty good usage. Exit Six held a fundraising concert for their Rockdo festival there the night before. 360 Sounds has also had shows there.  Young, Gifted, and Wack is doing a concert to celebrate their first anniversary there this Friday.  And Super Color Super is putting on an 11-band gig at the space on Saturday night.  More info about both of this weekend’s shows can be found in our “Coming Events” section.

So if you are in that part of Seoul, Keu Keu is worth supporting.